Shards of Earth by Adrian Tchaikovsky – Blog Tour

Hi! I haven’t done a book tour in a hot minute! …and I’m super late. Apologies, but life really got in the way. I was meant to post 3 days ago.

Today we’re talking about Shards of Earth by Adrian Tchaikovsky. This is more of a first impressions post, as I haven’t finished the book yet. Let’s go.

The Shards of Earth by Adrian Tchaikovsky
  • Publication date: August 3rd 2021
  • Publisher: Tor
  • Genre: Sci-fi

The war is over. Its heroes forgotten. Until one chance discovery . . . Idris has neither aged nor slept since they remade him in the war. And one of humanity’s heroes now scrapes by on a freelance salvage vessel, to avoid the attention of greater powers. After earth was destroyed, mankind created a fighting elite to save their species, enhanced humans such as Idris. In the silence of space they could communicate, mind-to-mind, with the enemy. Then their alien aggressors, the Architects, simply disappeared—and Idris and his kind became obsolete. Now, fifty years later, Idris and his crew have discovered something strange abandoned in space. It’s clearly the work of the Architects—but are they returning? And if so, why? Hunted by gangsters, cults and governments, Idris and his crew race across the galaxy hunting for answers. For they now possess something of incalculable value, that many would kill to obtain.

Sci-fi is one of my favourite genres and I especially enjoy space operas. But it’s also the genre that is harder to get into when you’re in a reading slump. I’ve read from Tchaikovsky before, and I enjoyed his writing and ideas, and I was really excited to pick this book up.

Right off the bat it throws you into the story with little explanation, enough to keep you intrigued but not to give too much away, which makes me believe the story will be nicely paced throughout.

The cast of characters seems very diverse and interesting. I love the found family trope, it’s one of my favourites and it’s meant to be present in this story! What’s better than a group of misfits on a space ship?!

I am not far into the book (about 20%), but I already love the writing. Some sci-fi books are a bit… too dry. Not Tchaikovsky’s writing. He writes in a very accessible way for non sci-fi readers, I think.

I can’t wait to get more into the story. I’ll be sure to post a full review once I’m done.

As I’m unable to give you more of my thoughts please check out these reviews:

Tessa

Bex

Blair

And check out The Write Reads hashtags for this tour!

As always, thanks for reading. Apologies for being late. Talk soon!

The Wrongful Death by Kenneth B. Andersen – A Review

Hi! It’s my stop on The Write Reads tour for the third book in Kenneth B. Andersen’s series. I’ve reviews for the first and second books, if you’d like to check those out first. So… without further ado, as we all know how bad I’m at introductions…

The Wrongful Death by Kenneth B. Andersen
  • Publication date: April 20th 2009 (original)
  • Publisher: Host & Son
  • Genre: Fantasy

An unfortunate chain of events makes Philip responsible for the untimely death of the school bully Sam—the Devil’s original choice for an heir. Philip must return to Hell to find Sam and bring him back to life, so that fate can be restored. But trouble is stirring in Lucifer’s kingdom and not even Philip can imagine the strange and dark journey that awaits him. A journey that will take him through ancient underworlds and all the way to Paradise.

Thank you to the author for sending an e-copy of the book for a review, and for Dave at The Write Reads for putting together this tour.

I’ve grown to really love this series. As I’ve mentioned at the start of every review, it really took me by surprise. While books one and two were between middle grade and YA, at least for me, I feel like The Wrongful Death got a bit darker.

Philip got himself into Hell again! What’s new? This time, by a very unfortunate mix up, Philip’s friend (and ex tormentor) Sam ends up dead and lost in Hell. All because of Philip (and partially Satina). So he has to venture back to the underworld and find him before it’s too late.

As always, Philip was a great protagonist to read from. He remains extremely likeable throughout those books, and it was a real pleasure following him through his adventures. One of my favourites aspects of those books are times where Philip is looking for his dad – every time he sets foot in the underworld he thinks about him and tries to find a way to see him. I feel like it might be a big part of the plot in the later books. I was glad to see many supporting characters, especially Lucifer himself. He’s one of my absolute favourites.

Andersen managed to add even more depth into the already rich world, and we got to visit Heaven and meet god, as well as Hades in his underworld. Apart from the main plot, there is also a lot going on in Hell and the atmosphere gets darker with every chapter. It is quite apparent a big war is brewing, and I’m dying to find out more.

I always find it hard to review sequels and keep them spoiler free, and so they’re usually considerably shorter than other reviews. I found The Wrongful Death to be a bridge of sorts between Philip’s somewhat innocent adventures in Hell (though how innocent can they really be), and something darker and more sinister. I enjoyed it immensely and I can’t wait to continue with the series, and see where they lead.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Thank you for reading.

Follow the tags on Twitter to find more reviews from this tour, as a lot of lovely reviewers already posted theirs.

The Die of Death by Kenneth B. Andersen – A Review

Hi! I’m back, just like I said I would be, with a very exciting review! It’s my stop on #TheWriteReads blog tour for A Die of Death by Kenneth B. Andersen! I’ve reviewed the first book as well, and you can read my review by clicking HERE

The Die of Death by Kenneth B. Andersen
  • Publication date: August 31st 2007
  • Publisher: Host og Son
  • Genre: Middle Grade/YA Fantasy

Philip’s adventures as the Devil’s apprentice have changed him—in a good way. Although he misses his friends in Hell, he has made new friends in life.

But when the future of the underworld is threatened once again, Philip’s help is needed. Death’s Die has been stolen and immortality is spreading across the globe.

Philip throws himself into the search—and discovers a horrible truth about his own life along the way.

*First and foremost, I have received a free e-copy from the author in exchange for an honest review.*

This series really took me by surprise. I mean it in the best way possible. As I said in my first review, I was afraid it wouldn’t be my cup of tea (for reasons unknown to me), but the first book turned out to be a great, super fun and original adventure story. I’m happy to report the second book didn’t disappoint either!

We start not too long after we left off. After his time in Hell, Philip comes back changed – he makes new friends and leaves his angel ways behind. He’s not quite the devil he’s turned into under Lucifer’s wing, but he’s definitely easier to tempt and give into some not-so-innocent fun. Just as he thinks he is back for good – the underworld needs him again! The die of Death has been stolen.

I want to start with saying it was such a pleasure returning to this world. I didn’t realise just how attached I got to it until I went back to the story. Hell is an interesting place, and we find out even more about its rules and inner workings. Just like in the first book we meet a few biblical and historical figures, and those small references interwoven in the story really add a lot of depth to the overall world building. Andersen adds so much richness to the world, expanding the underworld and showing us the outer perimeter of Hell and Mortimer’s house, as well as telling us about more sinister places I’m sure we’ll visit in the later books.

I said it before and I’ll say it again – Philip is a great protagonist to follow. He’s incredibly likeable, even when he strays, and you really root for him throughout the story. I loved seeing all the other characters, too! When Philip comes back to Lucifer’s palace, it’s like a family reunion. It’s heart warming as Philip comes from a broken family and has never met his father. I really like how consistent the characters stay in the second book – in some books, especially in sequels, the secondary characters tend to loose their personality a bit, especially if they’re taking the back burner after being one of the mains in the first book. Instead they become plot devices. That wasn’t the case in The Die of Death.

I loved the plot and pacing of this one. Philip is back in Hell to find Death’s missing die. Without it, Death can’t establish the length of the humans’ life – and that makes them immortal. While investigating the missing die, Philip discovers something about his own family and things get even more complicated. There’s never a dull moment in The Die of Death. The plot is gripping from start to finish, with more intrigue added as we go. First book talked a lot about morality and in this one we focus more on immortality and what it means to live forever. I really like that there is depth to each of those stories other than just the adventure story we see on the surface. My only qualm is the subplot with Philip’s father and the fact that it was done twice. I understand where it came from, but it made the ending seem a bit repetitive and predictable.

I can’t wait to continue with the series and I’ll be picking up the third book real soon, as this was a pleasure to read!

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Please follow @ TheWriteReads on Twitter to find more reviews of this book!

I’ll talk to you very soon! Thanks for reading!